Toigo: Make your DR/BC planning fit your organization's needs

Toigo: Make your DR/BC planning fit your organization's needs

Date: Nov 16, 2012

Jon Toigo, founder and president of Toigo Partners International, answers a fundamental question of DR -- who should your organization trust with restoring normal operations following a disaster? In this Storage Decisions video, Toigo explains that there is no more reliable option than creating and maintaining your own disaster recovery or business continuity plan to meet your own organization's needs.

"There are no silver bullets to disaster recovery, okay? These new technologies are merely creating other, and sometimes more complex, recovery targets. They don't solve the problem that you read [about] in the glossy brochure. It's still going to require you. You're the person who stands between total cataclysmic destruction of your company and normalcy."

Disasters do happen, but they're different for every organization, said Toigo.

"Disasters are relative and contextual. I could take one application down for a week, and no one would [notice]. I could take another application down for a minute and my phone is ringing off the hook. It's different for every company," said Toigo.

Determining whether your disaster recovery or business continuity planning meets the specific DR needs of your company means understanding how long your organization can go without access to critical data -- basically, figuring what is an unacceptable interruption for retrieving your information. Toigo notes that determining whether an event is a disaster is based on how long it takes to resolve it.

Also, your BC planning process must justify budgeting for preventing a problem, since a successful prevention will mean no interruption in normal operations. And your strategy needs to be tied to specific kinds of systems -- a DR plan for voice systems will be different from data, for example. Toigo said "time to data" is the key metric for evaluating the solvency of a DR/BC plan.

"How quickly following an interruption event can I restore access [between] the decision maker and the data he needs to make decisions? That at the end of the day is what DR is all about," said Toigo. 

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