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Featured E-Handbooks

  • State-of-the-art data backup applications

    Cloud backup and disaster recovery are slowly gaining traction in the data protection space, particularly as many organizations leverage the hybrid on-premises/cloud approaches vendors rolled out in 2012. Other new backup techs are on the rise, as well, like array-based snapshots and converged backup/file sharing and archiving applications. Explore this expert Storage Handbook to get the scoop on data backup applications going into the new year, and learn about cloud backup and DR, snapshots, VM backups and big data protection.

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  • Evaluating hardware, software and hypervisor-based replication

    IT administrators today are faced with a variety of new or growing data protection challenges. For many, the tried and true approach of nightly backups has become impractical. Exponential data growth, the need for more frequent data protection and faster restores have forced administrators to look for alternatives to traditional data backups. One approach that is growing in popularity is to use a combination of replication and snapshots as a way of continuously protecting data. But there are a number of ways this can be accomplished, each with its own pros and cons.

    This handbook compares and contrasts hardware-based and software-based replication so you can better decide which approach suits your organization's needs. You will find an easy-to-digest chart detailing the pros and cons of each as well as articles offering greater detail. You will also learn why hypervisor-based replication is growing in popularity.

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Other E-Handbooks available for free to our members

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      • Best practices in disaster recovery tests

        DR testing is frequently put off or overlooked entirely. However, many surveys show that IT pros are not confident in their ability to recover in a timely manner following a disaster. There are a variety of reasons why IT people lack confidence in their DR plans, but many simply lack confidence in the backup/DR technologies they rely on. Technology isn't a substitute for a good backup strategy. And testing is the only way to find holes in your strategy. This Handbook offers guidelines for disaster recovery testing today, with a look at the variety of technologies and practices in use. You will find an expert Q&A outlining technologies that can make DR testing more effective. Another piece takes a look at how one company's quarterly DR test helped prepare them for Hurricane Sandy. And finally, check out a piece on DR testing for the cloud.

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      • Developing effective DR/BC plans

        Business continuity/disaster recovery planning is frequently overlooked, delayed or underfunded, because it can be painful to spend time and money on risk mitigation. As a result, we often read survey results that show IT managers are not confident in their company’s ability to adequately recover following a disaster. Indeed, year after year, our surveys show that organizations are not confident in their ability to recover data after an outage. And the reasons they cite remain largely the same. Some lack confidence in the backup/DR technologies they rely on. Others say that DR planning is too expensive and they can’t get management support for an initiative that isn’t directly tied to revenue. There are technologies and techniques available today that have simplified DR and made it more affordable. This handbook will offer tips on how to develop and implement a disaster recovery plan.

        View E-Handbook
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      • Best practices in disaster recovery tests

        DR testing is frequently put off or overlooked entirely. However, many surveys show that IT pros are not confident in their ability to recover in a timely manner following a disaster. There are a variety of reasons why IT people lack confidence in their DR plans, but many simply lack confidence in the backup/DR technologies they rely on. Technology isn't a substitute for a good backup strategy. And testing is the only way to find holes in your strategy. This Handbook offers guidelines for disaster recovery testing today, with a look at the variety of technologies and practices in use. You will find an expert Q&A outlining technologies that can make DR testing more effective. Another piece takes a look at how one company's quarterly DR test helped prepare them for Hurricane Sandy. And finally, check out a piece on DR testing for the cloud.

        View E-Handbook
      • Developing effective DR/BC plans

        Business continuity/disaster recovery planning is frequently overlooked, delayed or underfunded, because it can be painful to spend time and money on risk mitigation. As a result, we often read survey results that show IT managers are not confident in their company’s ability to adequately recover following a disaster. Indeed, year after year, our surveys show that organizations are not confident in their ability to recover data after an outage. And the reasons they cite remain largely the same. Some lack confidence in the backup/DR technologies they rely on. Others say that DR planning is too expensive and they can’t get management support for an initiative that isn’t directly tied to revenue. There are technologies and techniques available today that have simplified DR and made it more affordable. This handbook will offer tips on how to develop and implement a disaster recovery plan.

        View E-Handbook
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Evaluating hardware, software and hypervisor-based replication

        IT administrators today are faced with a variety of new or growing data protection challenges. For many, the tried and true approach of nightly backups has become impractical. Exponential data growth, the need for more frequent data protection and faster restores have forced administrators to look for alternatives to traditional data backups. One approach that is growing in popularity is to use a combination of replication and snapshots as a way of continuously protecting data. But there are a number of ways this can be accomplished, each with its own pros and cons.

        This handbook compares and contrasts hardware-based and software-based replication so you can better decide which approach suits your organization's needs. You will find an easy-to-digest chart detailing the pros and cons of each as well as articles offering greater detail. You will also learn why hypervisor-based replication is growing in popularity.

        View E-Handbook
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